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What’s the Difference Between Asphalt Shingles and Concrete Tile Roofing?

If you drive through most neighborhoods you’re likely to see varying roofing materials, but more often than not, you’ll notice that asphalt shingles seem to dominate as the most popular roofing material. Just like any other type of product, the most popular doesn’t always mean it’s the best in quality. The most common reason that homeowners and builders install asphalt shingles comes down to one thing– COST. They are less expensive than tile.

Concrete tile and asphalt shingles are both popular options to roof a modern home. They both come in different styles and colors and do look nice once completed. Both concrete and asphalt offer a variety of different looks to suit a homeowner’s desires and both are very durable.
They are also both tough and resistant to impact from inclement weather, but one of the issues with the asphalt shingles, though, is that they may blow off in high winds. Concrete tiles do not blow away.

Another difference between the two types comes with the initial installation. Concrete tiles are more difficult to install and require professional assistance. Added help at the time of installation can lead to extra initial costs. Normally a contractor doing the tile roofing job will have had a specific training just for that type of product. It is essential that it’s done correctly in order to have a safe, durable, and long lasting roof.

In addition to that, asphalt shingles are considered less environmentally friendly than concrete tiles because they do not serve to insulate and block heat from the home, which can lead to higher utility bills and increased energy use. It has been found that tile roofing can reduce heating and cooling costs because of the type of ventilation required upon installation.

Concrete tile roofs may be more expensive than asphalt shingles upon initial purchase, but they add value to a home and provide extra longevity. The variety of tiles available today really provide a unique look and style for any home or business. The curb appeal cannot be beat!

No other concrete roof tile manufacturer offers the range of styles and colors that Eagle offers. Options. Eagle has them, and they give you the ability to differentiate your projects while increasing their value. Eagle has developed regionally specific color lines with the help of professional colorists who understand industry trends.

Eagle Roofing Products. The company of choice.

Storm Related Roofing Expenses Bring Shingle Prices Up

Jim Stickland of Atlanta Action 2 news reported last week the headline, “Prices are going through the roof!” and he’s right. There has been a massive price increase that took place on March 1, 2013 for shingles. It is also reported that the prices will increase again on April 15, 2013. A bundle of shingles will now cost….a bundle! Shingle manufacturers are shipping more shingles to areas in the Hurricane Sandy areas which is leaving a smaller supply in the south.

The market leader Owens Corning has raised prices by double digits. This price increase has a big affect on everyone because it trickles down to the homeowners who have to pay more for their insurance premiums. So, even if you don’t need a new roof or roof repairs, you can still be affected.

It has already been reported that Allstate went up 9.9% in April of last year and State Farm has reported a 7% increase. Storm-related roofing expenses are a major reason for this change.

“The more this damage occurs, the more the insurance companies are laying out. They have to maintain their financial stability as well,” said Dave Colmans of the Georgia Insurance Information Service.

What does this mean for a homeowner in general? Tile shingles should be considered for your next roofing or re-roofing project. The durability, long lasting and long term investment– tile roofing is superior. It is the most cost-effective way to protect your biggest investment.

Tile Roofs vs. Shingle Roofs: What are the Differences?

Tile Roofs vs. Shingle Roofs: What is the Difference?

A roof is a roof is a roof….wrong.  There really are superior roofing materials available.  If you are trying to decide what kind of material to use on your roof here are some facts about the differences between using tile and using shingles for a new roof. There are many considerations of a tile roof or a shingle roof system. It is highly suggested to research which roof is better for your home and the climate that you live in.

1. What is the cost difference for tile roofs vs. shingle roofs?

When comparing tile roofs and shingle roofs, the first noticeable difference is the price. Tile is more expensive than shingles, usually at least double the price. However, the life expectancy of tile ends up being about double that of shingles, so it works out to be about even in that regard. One consideration is that high winds and bad weather can knock off your shingles much more easily than with tiles. Tiles are more durable and can withstand a lot more strain.

2. What climate is best for tile roofs vs. shingle roofs?

An important consideration to think about is your climate. If you are in an easier climate, weather-wise, it may not be a bad idea to go with shingles. Especially if money is tight at the moment, then it’s not really a disadvantage to you at all as the buyer. However, if you do live in the southeast of the United States, as well as other snow-ridden areas, it may be a wise choice to go with tiles when possible.  Tiles do perform well in cold climates.  They are not just for warm, sunny regions.  Snow easily slides from their surface and they are good conductors.
Some say that tile roofs can last for as long as 50 years, whereas shingles last about 20 years. Either way, with some maintenance, you are getting a lot of life for your roof, regardless of whether you choose shingles or tile. There is all typs of warranties for each roof depending on the contractor and the manufacture of the material. However, normally tile roof systems have a longer warranty.  (Ask about Eagle Roofing Tiles’ warranties.)

3. What type of roof can handle the weight of tile vs. shingle?

Another consideration that needs to be examined is the sturdiness of your roof. Not every roof can take the weight of a heavy tile roof. You want to consult with one of our roofing contractors to see what the carrying capacity of your roof really is, and then choose based on your budget, climate and your end goal.
Tile is definitely an advantage when looking to resell your home. It isn’t as important as having a nice roof, in general; however, if you have the option, ask your real estate agent about comparable homes in your area and the kind of roofs they have, to see if there is any difference in which kind of homes sell quicker and for a higher price. In some areas, you will find it to be very important, and in other areas it’s not that important at all. Do some research and stop by to one of Eagle Roofing Tile’s help centers to see samples and ask a representative for individual assistance.  You will be amazed at our selection and service.  The curb appeal of an Eagle Tile roof cannot be matched!

Concrete Roofing vs. Asphalt: Which is More Energy Efficient (Part 1)

I came across a recent question that was answered by Michael Holcomb from the Byron Center in Michigan. His explanation is excellent in answering the question of “Is an asphalt shingle roof or concrete tile better, energy wise?”

Holcomb suggests that it’s a question that might have a different response depending on your location.He goes on to say, “Let’s begin by reviewing how heat is transferred through roofing. Heat travels on light rays (radiant), in a vapor or liquid (convective) and through solid objects (conduction). When we say a roof is energy efficient we are speaking of its ability to reduce all three.In cold weather states conductive heat movement is not a function of roof coverings.All climate zones are concerned with radiant and convective heat transfer with regards to the roof structure.

In a predominantly cooling climate we should select a roof that reduces the impact of all three types of heat transfer since the sun radiates heat to the roof coverings which heat the roof structure conductively causing the attic to heat up. The heated air pressurizes the attic and may force the heated air into the habitable structure through convection.
So when we think of a roof covering as energy efficient we are almost always talking about how effective it is at reducing transfer of radiant heat into the attic via conduction or convection.”

When addressing the effectiveness of Asphalt shingles, he writes “Asphalt shingles are somewhat effective if you purchase a solar reflective roofing shingle. A percentage of radiant heat is bounced back into the atmosphere.
Unfortunately there is still enough heat that warms the roof and surrounding structure making the attic hot during sunny periods.
Since the asphalt shingles are in direct contact with felt underlayment and the felt is installed directly over the roof sheathing the entire structure is within a few degrees of the asphalt shingle temperature. Once the sheathing is heated up through conduction it warms up the attic which in turn warms up the living spaces through conduction and convection.”

He also contrasts them with Concrete shingles and says, “Concrete shingles are much more effective at reducing all three types of heat transfer.
Concrete tiles can be reflective in color which reduces heat gain.
Since they are elevated they actually allow the heat gain to be vented so the roof structure has significantly less heat gain.
The heated air under the shingles is vented through the ridge cap helping to keep the roof structure cool.
So strictly from an energy perspective concrete tiles are more energy efficient than asphalt shingles.”

See the rest of Holcombs explanation and thoughts in the next blog entry.

(Source: greenhomeguide.com)