New California Title 24 Requirements: Understanding How They Affect You and Your Customers

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California’s Title 24 energy standards address the energy efficiency of new construction of, and additions and alterations to, homes and commercial buildings. Since buildings are one of the major contributors to electricity demand, the goal of Title 24 is to reduce energy consumption in California for its energy future.

The Title 24 Roofing Code establishes new requirements to promote the installation of “Cool Roofs” in Low Rise Residential Steep Slope Construction. Cool Roofs are roofs consisting of materials with extraordinarily high reflectance of the sun’s energy from the roof surface, as well as have high emissivity, allowing them to emit infrared energy. Thus, significantly reducing energy costs and urban heat islands.

Eagle Roofing Products is committed to helping our partners adhere to the California Energy Commission’s energy standards by providing our Customers with Cool Roof concrete tile solutions that not only meet the new requirements, but deliver the beauty, durability and value that you’ve come to expect.

How does Title 24 Impact You?

  • Builders:      All new permits and buildings must comply
  • Architects:   Must plan for the new energy efficiency requirements
  • Roofers:      Can differentiate by knowing the new code

Cool Roof Criteria

California is divided into 16 climate zones. Buildings located in Climate Zones 10 -15 need to meet the following Solar Reflectance (SR), Thermal Emittance (TE) and Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) requirements as outlined by the California Energy Commission (CEC).

Solar Reflectance

  • Solar Reflectance (SR): Measure of a surface’s ability to reflect solar energy.
  • Dark surfaces tend to absorb solar energy, becoming hot and passing heat into the attic below. Lighter surfaces reflect solar energy and help keep the roof and building cooler.
  • Solar Reflectance is expressed as a percentage (0-100%) as listed by the CRRC.
  • Aged Solar Reflectance tests the surface after three years and is typically lower than initial solar reflectance.
  • The new Title 24 requirement for aged SR is .20 or 20%.

Thermal Emittance

  • Thermal Emittance (TE): The ability of a roofing material to release absorbed heat energy back into the atmosphere.
  • Surfaces with low emittance transfer more heat into the roof components and attic space.
  • Thermal Emittance is expressed as a percentage (0-100%) as listed by the CRRC.
  • The new Title 24 requirement for TE is .75 or 75%.

Solar Reflectance Index

  • Solar Reflectance Index (SRI): Index that uses a calculation, incorporating both SR and TEas listed by the CRRC.
  • A color is assigned a value between 0 and 100.
  • The California Energy Commission is concerned with aged SRI.
  • The aged SRI calculation is made using a 3 year aged reflectance, as listed with the CRRC.
  • The CRRC has a calculator for new colors to determine an estimated aged SRI.
  • The new Title 24 requirement for Estimated Aged SRI is 16.

New Construction Eagle Products Available

Title 24 Products 1

 

 

 

Re-Roof and Alterations Eagle Products Available

Climate Zones 10-15

  • Any tile color that has an aged SRI of 16 or more.
  • Any color of Capistrano.
  • Any tile installed on elevated battens that provide 1” between the bottom of the tile and the roof deck.

Requirements vary by zone, depending on the building and the climate method. Any municipality, even outside of climate zones 10-15, can choose to enforce these Title 24 changes. Any municipality in all climate zones can choose more strict regulations, such as Cal Green. It is important that contractors know the requirements in the municipalities where they re-roof.

To see which climate zone your project is in and the requirements associated with your building structure, visit the CEC’s website: http://www.energy.ca.gov/maps/renewable/building_climate_zones.html

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Eagle Technical Bulletin: Specialty Installations for Hips and Ridges

Across thPhoto1e western and southern United States, the most prominent and enduring architectural styles draw on Spanish and Mediterranean influences. The roofing material of choice for these styles is tile. Sometimes the use of tile alone does not provide the home/building owner with quite enough Spanish or Mediterranean flare. There are specialty installation techniques to solve this problem. We, at Eagle, will be producing a series of technical bulletins focusing on these techniques.

The first of these specialty installations addresses the hips and ridges of the roof. There are several ways trim tile can be used on the hips and ridges that will instantly add old-world charm to the look of the roof. This bulletin will concentrate on stacked hip starters, multiple trim courses, and random trim stacking.

Stacked Hip Starters

Typical installations call for the installation of one piece of trim at the bottom of each hip. The end can be left open in some regions, or it can be finished with mortar or a pre-formed mortar hip starter. A stylish departure from the norm is to stack tiles at the ends, creating a dramatic design element. There are several ways to create these stacks. Trim tiles cut to a smaller width and length, Boosted Accessory pieces, or the Capistrano field tiles- trimmed to remove the pan all provide the ideal sized pieces to create the stack. Another option is to cut trim pieces incrementally smaller to create a gradual stack.

Stack the pieces from 3-7 high, depending on the height of the board or riser you are using for trim attachment, before installing the first full trim piece. The tile at the bottom of the stack should be attached to the roof and each tile after should be attached to the tile below. Add to the look by using mortar between courses. In high wind areas, be sure to provide the necessary weather blocking.

Multiple Trim Courses

Another way to add old-world detail is to install multiple courses of trim on hips and/or ridges. For this detail, you will install your first course normally. Then add each additional course using an accepted method of attachment. You can finish the look with mortar at the nose of each trim piece. It is important to consult local building codes when deciding to add courses of trim tile.

Random Trim Stacking

Similar to the previous detail, you will start by installing the first course of trim tile normally. This time, though, you will add trim tiles to the hips and/or ridges randomly-using an accepted method of attachment. You can even vary the number of tiles stacked at each location. Then finish the look with mortar. Again, it is important to consult local building codes when deciding to use this detail.

EAGLE ROOFING PRODUCTS TECHNICAL BULLETIN – Specialty Installations for Hips and Ridges

Staggered CollageAcross the western and southern United States, the most prominent and enduring architectural styles draw on Spanish and Mediterranean influences.  The roofing material of choice for these styles is tile.  Sometimes the use of tile alone does not provide the home/building owner with quite enough Spanish or Mediterranean flare.  There are specialty installation techniques to solve this problem.  We, at Eagle, will be producing a series of technical bulletins focusing on these techniques.

The first of these specialty installations addresses the hips and ridges of the roof.  There are several ways trim tile can be used on the hips and ridges that will instantly add old-world charm to the look of the roof.  This bulletin will concentrate on stacked hip starters, multiple trim courses, and random trim stacking.

Stacked Hip Starters

Typical installations call for the installation of one piece of trim at the bottom of each hip.  The end can be left open in some regions, or it can be finished with mortar or a pre-formed mortar hip starter.  A stylish departure from the norm is to stack tiles at the ends, creating a dramatic design element. There are several ways to create these stacks.  Trim tiles cut to a smaller width and length, Boosted Accessory pieces, or the Capistrano field tiles- trimmed to remove the pan all provide the ideal sized pieces to create the stack.  Another option is to cut trim pieces incrementally smaller to create a gradual stack.

Stack the pieces from 3-7 high, depending on the height of the board or riser you are using for trim attachment, before installing the first full trim piece.  The tile at the bottom of the stack should be attached to the roof and each tile after should be attached to the tile below.  Add to the look by using mortar between courses.  In high wind areas, be sure to provide the necessary weather blocking.

Multiple Trim Courses

Another way to add old-world detail is to install multiple courses of trim on hips and/or ridges.  For this detail, you will install your first course normally.  Then add each additional course using an accepted method of attachment.  You can finish the look with mortar at the nose of each trim piece. It is important to consult local building codes when deciding to add courses of trim tile.

Random Trim Stacking

Similar to the previous detail, you will start by installing the first course of trim tile normally.  This time, though, you will add trim tiles to the hips and/or ridges randomly-using an accepted method of attachment.  You can even vary the number of tiles stacked at each location.  Then finish the look with mortar.  Again, it is important to consult local building codes when deciding to use this detail.

Eagle Roofing Products Celebrates 25 Years in Business

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Brandi Lessner
Marketing and Communications Coordinator
402 Northlake Blvd., Suite 1028
407-280-6315
brandil@eagleroofing.com

Eagle Roofing Products Celebrates 25 Years in Business

April 16, 2014

Rialto, Calif. –  Eagle Roofing Products announced they will spend 2014 celebrating 25 years in the concrete roofing tile business. A number of different promotions and events will be scheduled to show appreciation to the company’s customers, partners, employees and friends for their loyalty and service. Eagle Roofing credits these individuals with its ability to become a leader in the concrete roof tile industry.

Eagle’s long experience in the roof tile industry and dedication to prompt personal response to its customers’ needs have resulted in a well-deserved reputation for quality and service-a reputation that is unmatched. This reputation has been honed over the past quarter century through the owner’s commitment to making Eagle a great place to work.

The company’s employee turnover is incredibly low and what is most impressive is their ability to hire engaged dedicated employees. Doing so has facilitated Eagle’s goal of providing industry leading customer engagement.

Sales Rep. Ali Spingler Presents Commemorative Tile to Gulf Western Roofing

Sales Rep. Ali Spingler Presents Commemorative Tile to Gulf Western Roofing

John Campbell, National Sales and Marketing Director for Eagle Roofing, said in a statement, “Eagle Roofing Products is proud to celebrate its 25th anniversary in 2014. The company has persevered through a commitment to hiring the best people and creating an environment in which they may thrive.” He added, “Our employees are the foundation that allows us to be a 25-year-old, customer service-driven company that happens to produce the finest concrete roof tile in the industry.”

About Eagle Roofing Products:  Eagle Roofing Products is a division of Burlingame Industries, a California-based, privately held family organization that has been in the concrete tile industry for over 40 years. Founded in 1989 with five employees, Eagle has grown to four manufacturing plants, seven design centers and a work force of 500 employees, specializing in providing concrete tile roofing solutions for the building industry. For additional information on Eagle Roofing Products, visit www.eagleroofing.com, or contact us at 1-888-TILE ROOF.

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How Do Concrete Roof Tiles Perform in Cold Weather Conditions?

ASnow Tile Roofs parts of the country are dealing with yet another brutal winter storm, it seems like a good time to discuss the best materials for protecting your home against the elements. While most homes in areas prone to snow tend to boast asphalt shingles, there are far superior materials available for cold-weather roofing.

 

We all know that concrete roofing tiles are popular in hot, sunny states due to their energy-saving, highly insulating properties. Those attributes also work to keep out the cold, meaning lower bills for heating the structure.

The density and durability of concrete tiles made by Eagle Roofing Products make them a prime choice for buildings in cold or high freeze-thaw cycling areas. Unlike more porous materials like asphalt, concrete tiles are not susceptible to moisture freezing within the body of the tile. Concrete tiles also have a naturally occurring air pocket between the underside of the tile and the roof sheathing that, when installed and ventilated correctly, minimize ice-damming as well as tile expansion and contraction due to changes in temperature.

As an added measure, Eagle uses specific application procedures that manage the snow blanket that may accumulate on the roof to prevent the snow turning into a block of ice or sliding off the roof in large sheets.

Speaking of damage caused by ice and snow accumulation, most owners with tile roofs in the colder regions report that, “If installed properly the first time, there’s really not much that has to be done to maintain a tile roof.” While we cannot promise our roofs will always be damage-free, they are far less prone to such costly issues and require much less work to keep them that way. This comes in handy during snow storms when the odds of convincing a roofing repair company to come fix a weather-damaged roof are practically zero.

Basically, you could not ask for a better roof system during a snow storm.

For more information, visit our website at www.eagleroofing.com or call 1-888-TILE-ROOF, 24/7.

Tile Roof Installation: Why Training is a Must and Where to Get It

We know we may be a little biased here at Eagle Roofing, but, tile roofing is just plain superior. We really mean it. That is why training is offered to those individuals who want to learn how to properly install a tile roof; nothing that nice is easy to construct.

Tile roofs not only add value to your home but are exceptionally durable, allowing them to endure a lot of what Mother Nature throws at them. Concrete roofing can withstand high winds better than other materials and can take a freezing and thawing in any climate. That means that, just because you may live in an area north of the Sunbelt, you do not have to miss out on the aesthetic and structural advantages of concrete tile.

As you may know, tile weighs more than asphalt shingles. The strength, longevity and aesthetic appeal of roof tile is a by-product of it composition – color infused concrete. It is a common misconception that the best time to install a tile roof is when you’re building a new home. While it is easier to prepare the roof structure of a new home for a tile roof, the underlying roof structure of most homes can be modified for a tile roof with minimal reinforcement. If you’re interested in upgrading your home’s value and curb appeal by upgrading to a tile roof, you will want to obtain a structural report from an engineer first.

As you can see, there are many requirements to consider when installing a roof of this quality. Before you do so, contact our friends at the Tile Roofing Institute (TRI). They offer classes all over the United States to help people learn how to meet or exceed industry guidelines because they know today’s consumers expect trades-people ‒ including tile roofing installers ‒ to have trade certification. TRI employs professional instructors to teach not only proper tile roof installation, but also to help your company’s performance in all areas such as workmanship, efficiency, best practices, and code-compliance.

If you wish to meet with TRI as well as other industry professionals from multiple concrete roofing tile manufacturers, visit the Carolina Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association (CRSMCA) Mid-Winter Conference in Raleigh, NC on January 21-23, 2014.

Eagle Design Centers Offer More Than Just Color Selection

Eagle Roofing Products’ Design Centers are integral in working toward our goal to be the easiest company in the industry to conduct business with.

Each Design Center is staffed by a design professional who can assist in selecting the ideal Eagle concrete roofing tile for any home or business. Design Center Coordinators are educated professionals with experience in interior/exterior design, many of whom are members of the ASID (American Society of Interior Designers). Along with their specialized knowledge of exteriors, our Coordinators are well-versed in all specifications of our tiles and our components, which help create an overall superior roof system.

With six profiles, over 140 color offerings and seven locations throughout California, Arizona and Florida, Eagle hopes to provide its key markets with professional, peaceful, beautifully displayed environments where customers can complete their exterior packages at their own pace.

In addition to our Builder and Designer concrete tile collections, our Design Centers offer a wide selection of Cool Roof Tile colors to choose from for re-roof and new construction projects, which are approved by ENERGY STAR and the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) for reflectivity testing. Our Coordinators can help choose Eagle colors that may be eligible for rebates through homeowner utility companies, are compliant with California’s 2008 Title 24 requirements, as well help choose colors that qualify for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) points ultimately allowing that project to meet the requirements to be LEED certified.

To allow for a more comprehensive exterior selection, the Design Centers are also equipped with samples from other manufacturers. While each center’s offerings vary, Coronado Stone as well as Glidden and Sherwin Williams paints are a few examples.

Visitors schedule appointments for consultations with a DC Coordinator to make selections for their projects.  Appointments are necessary because, depending on the complexity of the selection process, visits typically last anywhere from one to three hours.

To find a Design Center in your area, click here. For anyone without a Design Center in their area, phone and online consultations are available.

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Why Eagle Roofing Has the Best Options

Eagle Roofing tiles are a great alternative to other options and there are many reasons for this. It’s good to have a bit of background as you’re exploring options so you know how and why to make your choice.

One of the first reasons to consider concrete tiles is because they are very durable and last for many years. The lesser expense makes them a great option for large construction projects and for improving the appearance of a low-budget project. Concrete tiles come in several different styles and colors, which makes them versatile for many different kinds of projects.

The style you choose should reflect the design of the house, to enhance the overall impression. Concrete tile shapes and sizes vary. Eagle Roofing Products has an amazing selection to match anyone’s style and taste. Keep in mind that most concrete tiles will average around 80 to 100 tiles per 100 square feet, depending on the size of the tiles. All concrete tiles must have an underlayment to protect the roof from leaks and other damage. A 19-degree roof pitch is usually required for cement tiles to be effective. It’s important to speak with an Eagle Roofing representative to answer any questions you may have and to hire a licensed contractor to ensure that the roof is installed correctly.

A licensed contractor will make sure your building is capable of handling the heavy weight of the concrete tiles. Your building contractor can help assess the place of concrete tiles in your construction project if you are not sure if your building or home can handle the weight. The average weight for concrete tiles is 950 to 1000 pounds per 100 square feet.

No other concrete roof tile manufacturer offers the range of styles and colors that Eagle offers. Options. Eagle has them, and they give you the ability to differentiate your projects while increasing their value. Eagle has developed regionally specific color lines with the help of professional colorists who understand industry trends.

Eagle Roofing Products. The company of choice.

If you have questions or additional concerns, contact Eagle Roofing today!

 

What’s the Difference Between Asphalt Shingles and Concrete Tile Roofing?

If you drive through most neighborhoods you’re likely to see varying roofing materials, but more often than not, you’ll notice that asphalt shingles seem to dominate as the most popular roofing material. Just like any other type of product, the most popular doesn’t always mean it’s the best in quality. The most common reason that homeowners and builders install asphalt shingles comes down to one thing– COST. They are less expensive than tile.

Concrete tile and asphalt shingles are both popular options to roof a modern home. They both come in different styles and colors and do look nice once completed. Both concrete and asphalt offer a variety of different looks to suit a homeowner’s desires and both are very durable.
They are also both tough and resistant to impact from inclement weather, but one of the issues with the asphalt shingles, though, is that they may blow off in high winds. Concrete tiles do not blow away.

Another difference between the two types comes with the initial installation. Concrete tiles are more difficult to install and require professional assistance. Added help at the time of installation can lead to extra initial costs. Normally a contractor doing the tile roofing job will have had a specific training just for that type of product. It is essential that it’s done correctly in order to have a safe, durable, and long lasting roof.

In addition to that, asphalt shingles are considered less environmentally friendly than concrete tiles because they do not serve to insulate and block heat from the home, which can lead to higher utility bills and increased energy use. It has been found that tile roofing can reduce heating and cooling costs because of the type of ventilation required upon installation.

Concrete tile roofs may be more expensive than asphalt shingles upon initial purchase, but they add value to a home and provide extra longevity. The variety of tiles available today really provide a unique look and style for any home or business. The curb appeal cannot be beat!

No other concrete roof tile manufacturer offers the range of styles and colors that Eagle offers. Options. Eagle has them, and they give you the ability to differentiate your projects while increasing their value. Eagle has developed regionally specific color lines with the help of professional colorists who understand industry trends.

Eagle Roofing Products. The company of choice.

Eagle Being Green: Doing Our Part to Help the Environment

It’s important to you and your family, and ours as well. We love our planet and want to do our part to help the environment in we do.
We take our commitment to being environmentally friendly seriously, which is evident in our Eagle Green initiative. We’d like to share with you some of the steps we take to produce a product and business that keeps our planet safe and clean. 

We lead all other concrete tile manufacturers with our recycling and re-use activities:

• We make a concerted effort to reduce haul-off from all of our plants when purchasing the most energy-efficient 
and environmentally safe equipment we can find.

• Rejected tile is crushed and re-introduced into the manufacturing process.

• Trash that cannot be recycled is compacted to reduce landfill deposits.

• Wood tile pallets are repaired and re-used whenever possible.

• Synthetic oils are used on machinery when possible due to their long life-span.

• Engine oil and filters from plant equipment are recycled.

• All Eagle tile sealers are water-based.

If you have questions about our tile manufacturing or about the environmental benefits of tile roofing, please contact us at eagleroofing.com.